Last Friday, I organized a symposium at Harvard Law School hosted by the Harvard Law & International Development Society (LIDS) and titled “Post-Conflict Reconstruction: Rebuilding from Emergency to Development,” which brought together practitioners, experts, and academics across the country and world to discuss issues of economic growth and development, and supporting the rule of law in countries arising from conflict.

It was a great success, with lots of insights gained and ideas exchanged.  It was my first real time organizing an event of this scale, and I was so excited to see the vibrant outcomes and exchanges from it!  Especially close to my heart was the second panel, focusing on justice and security reform after conflict. Vivek Maru, of Namati, spoke about their work promoting the use of grassroots community outreach workers (modeled after the “community health worker” model), and how this model of “community paralegals” can be especially effective in supporting ordinary people in accessing justice in fragile countries such as Sierra Leone, post-conflict. In such situations where the justice infrastructure is damaged and often difficult to access by much of the population, supporting justice can be done through the use of paralegals who can help mediate disputes, access information about their legal rights, and address injustices both individual (e.g land rights disputes, family law matters) and collective (mining abuses, collective actions). In the absence of a strong formal justice system in post-conflict countries, the grassroots justice model offers a place to start — and to start with the people rather than at the top-down institutional level.

Here are a few pictures below! Click here for the LIDS website and to access more information on the event, photos, and videos.

IMG_0572Keynote speaker, Dr. Donald Kaberuka – President of the African Development Bank – talks about post-conflict reconstruction and promoting economic growth across Africa.

DSC_0848The first panel focused on building institutions and driving economic growth in countries after conflict. 

DSC_0854The panel included practitioners from across institutions such as The Asia Foundation, USAID, and the World Bank. It was a great look into the tricky challenge of how to rebuild institutions in fragile states.

IMG_0648The second panel focused on developing the rule of law, stability, and security in countries after conflict.

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