women's rights

What will it take?

In recent conversations about gender violence, I have found myself thinking: what will it take to truly end domestic and gender-based violence? Currently, it seems like almost everything that needs to be done, is being done in some form or other across the world.

We have programs focused on prevention: on changing media representation of women, of improving education for girls and young boys about healthy relationships, and of changing social norms and challenging social stigma. We have a wealth of programs in the U.S. at least – and then around the world – focusing on urgent care and response for survivors, ensuring that survivors of domestic violence or sexual assault have access to the care and services they need to heal and move forward from the trauma. This can include everything from legal aid services to medical care to housing and economic empowerment for survivors and their families. Of course, these services never seem to be enough to meet the need, but they are there and they are being piloted across the world. We also have programs focused more on empowering survivors, through advocacy, activism, counseling, and healing processes. Next, organizations focus on changing the law — altering unjust laws that do not provide the requisite protection to women and girls, condoning violence and failing to adequately remedy it. And finally, we have programs and ideas focused on the batterer: prosecution, probation, and then batterers’ intervention programs.

In this past semester of law school, I have been delving into this research and taking a look at the initiatives out there to combat violence against women and girls, and to assess the gaps and where more contributions could be valuable. One area where I see the need is to address social stigma and lack of access to services, through the use of community-based paralegals/advocates who are trained laypeople able to build a supportive social network for survivors and also provide long-term accompaniment to survivors in accessing needed services. However, this still seems to be very much a service-delivery model, much like many out there, and may continue to emphasize the victimization of women and girls. I do think we need more models and initiative that are led by survivors themselves in order to combat dominant narratives and to truly ensure solutions are targeted towards survivors’ needs.

Dear readers: if you have any thoughts, ideas, or suggestions, please comment or send a note! What do you think is missing in the current landscape of programs targeting violence against women, worldwide? What is most needed, and where do the gaps lie? How can we make change in this space? And what will it truly take, in the end, to end men’s violence against women?

Share

One thought on “What will it take?”

  1. Shabina Hussain says:

    All the available resources are at the surface level i.e., the legal support for the victims & educational material for the use of the communities.

    However, communities listen more to their faith groups and follow their cultural biases and practices. What needs to happen is to bring about a change in the mindset. The educational material that gets rid of gender bias must target the community leaders, priests, elders as well as teachers and parents. Once their attitude changes then, they would reach out to their peers, followers and children.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Time limit is exhausted. Please reload the CAPTCHA.