Reading List

Here’s a list of what I’ve read recently — feel free to comment or send me an email if you want to chat about these! Also, catch up with me on Goodreads for more!

Read in 2015

Unfinished Business: Women Men Work Family – Anne-Marie Slaughter
The Big Truck That Went By: How the World Came to Save Haiti and Left Behind a Disaster – Jonathan Katz
Ready Player One – Ernest Cline
Trail of Broken Wings – Sejal Badani
Bad Feminist – Roxane Gay
We Should All Be Feminists – Chimamanda Adichie
Men Explain Things To Me – Rebecca Solnit
The Girl on the Train – Paula Hawkins
Everything I Never Told You – Celeste Ng
Death Comes for the Archbishop– Willa Cather
Gone Girl – Gillian Flynn
Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail– Cheryl Strayed
Pink Sari Revolution: A Tale of Women and Power in India– Amana Fontanella-Khan
Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? – Mindy Kaling

Read in 2014

The International Rule of Law Movement: A Crisis of Legitimacy and the Way Forward – David Marshall (ed.)
The Will to Change: Men, Masculinity, and Love– bell hooks
Divergent Series: Divergent, Insurgent, Allegiant– Veronica Roth
Artemis Fowl Series (Artemis Fowl / The Arctic Incident / The Eternity’s Code / The Opal Deception / The Lost Colony)– Eoin Colfer
How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia– Mohsin Hamid
However Long the Night: Molly Melching’s Journey to Help Millions of African Women and Girls Triumph– Aimee Molloy
Letters to a Young Poet– Rainer Maria Rilke
The Locust Effect: Why the End of Poverty Requires the End of Violence– Gary Haugen

Read in 2013

The Blue Sweater: Bridging the Gap between Rich and Poor in an Interconnected World – Jacqueline Novogratz
Day of Honey: A Memoir of Food, Love, and War – Annia Ciezadlo
Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity – Katherine Boo
A Princess Found – Sarah Culberson
Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead – Sheryl Sandberg
Mighty Be Our Powers: How Sisterhood, Prayer, and Sex Changed a Nation at War – Leymah Gbowee
Zen Under Fire: How I Found Peace in the Midst of War – Marianne Elliott
Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking – Susan Cain
Second Person Singular – Sayed Kashua
The Ringtone and the Drum: Travels in the World’s Poorest Countries – Mark Weston
And the Mountains Echoed – Khaled Hosseini
Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls – David Sedaris
Poor Economics: A Radical Rethinking of the Way to Fight Global Poverty – Abhijit Banerjee and Esther Duflo
Bossypants – Tina Fey
Yes Means Yes! Visions of Female Sexual Power and A World Without Rape – Jaclyn Friedman, Jessica Valenti
Waiting for the Taliban: A Journey Through Northern Afghanistan – Anna Badhken
White Teeth – Zadie Smith
The Lowland – Jhumpa Lahiri
Decisive: How to Make Better Choices in Life and Work – Chip Heath
India Calling: An Intimate Portrait of a Nation’s Remaking – Anand Giridharas
Americanah – Chimamanda Adichie

Read in 2012

Haiti After the Earthquake – Paul Farmer
The Post-American World – Fareed Zakaria
Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do? – Michael Sandel
Norwegian Wood – Haruki Murakami
Catching Fire – Suzanne Collins
Ender’s Game – Orson Scott Card
Predictably Irrational – Dan Ariely
Love, InshAllah: The Secret Love Lives of American Muslim Women – Nura Maznavi, Ayesha Mattu (eds)
Mockingjay – Suzanne Collins
The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness – Michelle Alexander
SuperFreakonomics – Steven Levitt, Stephen Dubner
A Golden Age – Tahmima Anam
The Revolution Will Not Be Funded: Beyond the Non-Profit Industrial Complex – Incite! Women of Color Against Violence
The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle – Haruki Murakami
Getting To Maybe– Richard Fischl, Jeremy Paul
Good to Great and the Social Sectors – Jim Collins
Our Kind of People: A Continent’s Challenge, A Country’s Hope – Uzodinma Iweala
Confessions of an Economic Hit Man – John Perkins
Freedom From Want – Ian Smillie

Read in 2011

Shantaram – Gregory Davis Roberts
The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest – Steig Larsson
Stones into Schools: Promoting Peace with Education in Afghanistan and Pakistan – Greg Mortenson
Feminist Theory: From Margin to Center – bell hooks
A Woman Among Warlords: The Extraordinary Story of an Afghan Who Dared to Raise Her Voice – Malalai Joya
The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates – Wes Moore
Infidel – Ayaan Hirsi Ali
Sonia Sotomayor: The True American Dream – Antonia Felix
Taking On the System: Rules for Radical Change in a Digital Era – Markos Moulitsas Zuniga
Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother – Amy Chua
The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood
When You Are Engulfed in Flames – David Sedaris
The Hunger Games – Suzanne Collins
Here Comes Everybody: The Power of Organizing Without Organizations – Clay Shirky
The Gifts of Imperfection – Brene Brown
Work On Purpose – Lara Galinsky
Shooting Water: A Memoir of Second Chances, Family, and Filmmaking – Devyani Saltzman
Between Two Worlds: Escape from Tyranny: Growing Up in the Shadow of Saddam – Zainab Salbi
The Year of Magical Thinking – Joan Didion
Anil’s Ghost – Michael Ondaatje

Read in 2010

The Bottom Billion: Why the Poorest Countries are Failing and What Can Be Done About It – Paul Collier
African Development: Making Sense of the Issues and Actors – Todd Moss
Smart Aid For African Development – Richard Joseph, Alexandra Gillies (editors)
The Theory of Moral Sentiments – Adam Smith
Me to We: Finding Meaning in a Material World – Craig Kielburger
Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide – Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn
The Lovely Bones – Alice Sebold
No Matter How Loud I Shout: A Year in the Life of Juvenile Court – Edward Humes
Outliers: The Story of Success – Malcolm Gladwell
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo – Stieg Larsson
Mountains Beyond Mountains – Tracy Kidder
The Rich Get Richer and the Poor Get Prison: Ideology, Class, and Criminal Justice – Jeffrey Reiman
Out of Poverty – Paul Polak
Indefensible: One Lawyer’s Journey into the Inferno of American Justice – David Feige
The Girl Who Played with Fire – Stieg Larsson
Strength in What Remains – Tracy Kidder
Michelle: A Biography – Liza Mundy
Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness – Cass Sunstein, Richard Thaler
Purple Hibiscus – Chimamanda Adichie
The Thing Around Your Neck – Chimamanda Adichie
In Defense of Food: An Eater’s Manifesto – Michael Pollan
A Woman in Charge: The Life of Hillary Rodham Clinton – Carl Bernstein
The Unbearable Lightness of Being – Milan Kundera
Soul of a Citizen: Living with Conviction in Challenging Times – Paul Loeb
Leaving Microsoft to Change the World – John Wood
The Places In Between – Rory Stewart
The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao – Junot Díaz
When Broken Glass Floats: Growing Up Under the Khmer Rouge – Chanrithy Him

Read in 2009

Three Cups of Tea – Greg Mortenson
The Future of Freedom: Illiberal Democracy at Home and Abroad – Fareed Zakaria
A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier – Ishmael Beah
After Dark – Haruki Murakami
Dead Aid: Why Aid Is Not Working and How There Is a Better Way for Africa – Dambisa Moyo
In Spite of the Gods: The Rise of Modern India – Edward Luce
Emergency Sex (and Other Desperate Measures) – Kenneth Cain, Heidi Postlewait, Andrew Thomson
Be Bold – by Echoing Green
How to Change the World: Social Entrepreneurs and the Power of New Ideas – David Bornstein
Emma’s War: A True Story – Deborah Scroggins
Not on Our Watch: The Mission to End Genocide in Darfur and Beyond – Don Cheadle, John Prendergast
A Culture of Corruption: Everyday Deception and Popular Discontent in Nigeria – Daniel Jordan Smith
Tears of the Desert: A Memoir of Survival in Darfur – Halima Bashir
An Ordinary Man – Paul Ruesesabagina
Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir in Books – Azar Nafisi

Some of my other all-time favorites:

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6 thoughts on “Reading List”

  1. Isaias says:

    Dear Akhila Kolisetty (If I may),
    I just came across your blog just now (directed by an rss feed on my transitional justice list). I quickly looked through your post/blogs and like the energy and enthusiasm with which you write; plus i found a lot of overlapping between your reading list and mine. For now, I write to say I read Michela Wrong's “It’s Our Turn to Eat: The Story of a Kenyan Whistle-Blower”, it is a delightful read; however, it may give the whole picture. This being my own take, I would like to read your reaction posted on your blog [just curious to see how others have reacted, as i have not met people who read the book in my school].
    Cheers and keep on the great work.
    Isaias

  2. Isaias says:

    Dear Akhila Kolisetty (If I may),
    I just came across your blog just now (directed by an rss feed on my transitional justice list). I quickly looked through your post/blogs and like the energy and enthusiasm with which you write; plus i found a lot of overlapping between your reading list and mine. For now, I write to say I read Michela Wrong's “It’s Our Turn to Eat: The Story of a Kenyan Whistle-Blower”, it is a delightful read; however, it may give the whole picture. This being my own take, I would like to read your reaction posted on your blog [just curious to see how others have reacted, as i have not met people who read the book in my school].
    Cheers and keep on the great work.
    Isaias

  3. Akhila says:

    Isais,

    Thanks for stopping by and checking out my reading list! I am taking a wonderful class right now on State, Democracy, and Corruption in Africa. There we read a couple of chapters of Michela Wrong's book and I really enjoyed it. I feel sort of incomplete having read only 2 chapters/parts of it so I really want to pick it up to gain a better sense of corruption and the situation in Kenya.

    I think any book about corruption isn't going to give the picture. Of course there is a lot more about the society than corruption, and it's not the only problem there either. What I hope is that she provides some solutions to corruption. I read at the end of the book that she suggests capitalist solutions, also taking the view that aid to governments generally perpetuates corruption as there is no accountability. I'd be curious to finish reading the book and learn more.

    What do you think?

  4. Laura Fragiacomo says:

    excellent reading list 🙂 thanks for sharing….

  5. Akhila says:

    Glad you liked it! 🙂

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